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The bulk of Australia’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) workforce is made up of engineers, a male dominated profession still struggling to attract more women.

According to Australia’s 2020 STEM Workforce report, 80 per cent of the VET-trained STEM labour force and 38 per cent of university-qualified STEM workers are engineers.

To get a better understanding of the engineering workforce, this year’s report includes a new section called ‘a closer look at engineering’.

The 2020 report uses data from the 2006, 2011 and 2016 censuses to explore changes to the workforce.

Between 2011 and 2016 the number of university qualified engineers in the workforce grew by 28 per cent (60,030 people), compared to a 25 per cent rise in the number of university-qualified workers across the entire STEM workforce.

For VET-qualified STEM workers, engineers had the lowest female representation (five per cent), compared to 56 per cent female representation in those with science qualifications. For university-qualified workers, engineering had only 16 per cent representation compared to 50 per cent for science.

Moreover, the percentage of male engineers in full time employment was also 83 per cent, and 54 per cent for women. Female engineers also had a higher rate of unemployment than their male counterparts across the board.

More women in senior STEM-related positions are needed to reinforce positive role-models and a great way of doing this is by showcasing the best and the brightest.

One of the most popular categories in the annual HVACR Leadership Awards is the Woman of the Year in HVACR Award.

Women want to support other women. The Woman of the Year in HVACR Award has been won by an incredibly diverse mix of women – they have been engineers, technicians and small business owners.

This year it is even more important for women to showcase their abilities, just ask the award sponsor, Daikin Australia.

Daikin’s national marketing manager, Dan Tosh, said there is a strong business case for gender diversity.

“It adds to the decision-making process contributing a greater mix of perspectives and ideas,” he said.

This is your final chance to nominate as entries close on Friday, September 4, 2020.

Nominate at www.climatecontrolnews.com.au/awards

 

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